Author - shawn sheffield

3D Printing in North Carolina

North Carolina knows rapid prototyping and 3D printing. N.C. State University, Duke University, UNC Chapel Hill and the Research Triangle Park anchor the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area, making the region a hotbed of rapid prototyping on the East Coast. The Tar Heel State also has (as of February 2017) more than 326 3D Hubs within its borders and 3D-printing work labs spread throughout the campuses of its post-secondary schools. To get to know 3D printing in North Carolina, start with the innovators and look to the area’s large amount of colleges and universities.

Innovators

Chapel Hill’s altruistic star shined bright in 2014, when UNC biomedical engineering major Jeff Phillips created a prosthetic hand for a local 7-year-old born using a 3D printer and 3D printer filament from UNC’s biomedical engineering lab. At a cost of about $20 for the filaments, the prosthetic allowed the child to grasp objects for the first time, and contributed to advancement in the field of prosthetics.

Aly Khalifa, TEDxer and cofounder of Raleigh-based Designbox, approached leather shoes’ resistance to biodegradability by starting LYF shoes, which makes modular footwear without adhesives. LYF shoes not only break down easier than leather shoes, you can repair them or print new uppers and soles, which consist of an insole, performance plate, heel lock and sole, using a 3D printer.

Author and entrepreneur Ping Fu and 3D printing go way back — all the way to 1997 when she co-founded 3D software firm, Geomagic — and she hasn’t stopped since, now serving as 3D Systems‘ Chief Strategy Officer in the Research Triangle Park. 3D Systems produces the Figure 4 printer, which prints 50 times faster than conventional SLA 3D printing systems and puts out about four billion drops of 3D printing filament per minute.

3D Printing at N.C. State: Hunt and D.H. Hill

N.C. State’s J.B. Hunt Jr. Library features a Makerspace workstation that offers a 3D scanner and three 3D printers — a Fusion F306, a Formlabs Form1+ and a Stratasys uPrint SE Plus — for faculty, staff and student use. Hunt charges $10 per cubic inch of ABSplus, 35 cents per gram of PLA filament and 60 cents per milliliter of photopolymer resin.

The Makerspace at NCSU’s D.H. Hill Library provides students and staff with a host of 3D printing software, including Autodesk Fusion 360, MakerBot Desktop and Blender.

Duke University

Duke University offers the U.S. education system’s largest 3D printing facility, with a 24-7 lab that features 56 3D printers. In addition to commodity printers, Duke researchers work with state-of-the-art equipment and technology, such as PolyJet, laser sintering printers and the Carbon 3D SL process.

Wake Forest University

Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem leads the nation in the bioengineering application of 3D printing technology. Research scientists and students at Wake Forest School of Medicine, for example, made 3D printing of human tissue reality by crafting body parts and organs using live cells sourced from patients. Led by Dr. Anthony Atala, the team makes ears by printing a scaffold of the ear and grafting cells onto it, and makes solid organs, such as bladders, by printing the organ’s structure using polymers and living cells and creating channels that deliver nutrients and allow capillaries to form.

Wake Tech Community College

Wake Tech Community College in Raleigh has a robust 3D printing program that includes courses for enrolled students and Model 3D sessions open to both students and the general public at the main and northern campuses. Wake offers six courses that incorporate 3D printing in their syllabi and a stand-alone specialized certification course in 3D printing. Wake Tech also offers a 3D Hub for fabricating designs.

Central Carolina Community College

Central Carolina Community College (CCCC), with campuses in Chatham, Harnett and Lee counties, offers Associate degrees, vocational certifications and diploma programs in computer-aided drafting technology that rely heavily on 3D printing and CADD modeling and design software, including Inventor, SolidWorks, MasterCam and AutoCAD.

Randolph Community College

Randolph Community College in Asheboro provides two-year degrees in interior design that require on-campus training in 3D modeling and printing with the design lab’s Mcor Matrix 300+ industrial printer. The curriculum includes training in SketchUp, Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and InDesign.

Primary and Secondary Schools

North Carolina boasts a number of private primary and secondary schools, such as Ravenscroft Prep School in Raleigh, Peak Charter Academy in Apex and Cary Academy in Cary, that make 3D printing technologies part of the curricula starting as early as ninth grade. Cary Academy, for example, includes study in architectural design, designing and fabricating scale models of structures, such as the school’s campus.

Where to Buy 3D Printer Filament

Check out MakeShaper next time you’re in the market for high-quality 3D printer filament. Based in Sanford, MakeShaper is North Carolina’s largest 3D printer filament maker. More than a manufacturer, MakeShaper is made of individuals active in the rapid prototyping scene on both personal and professional levels.

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Printing Flexible Filament – Things to Consider

Printing with flexible filament can be a delicate balancing act. To achieve great results, your printer needs to be a finely tuned machine along with using a good high quality filament and perfecting the settings in your slicing software.  Here are five things to consider when printing flexible material. Remember, changing any of these can drastically change the print.

1. Print Speed

Due to the nature of flexible TPU filament and the potential to kink or buckle when being pushed though the hot end, it is highly recommended that you hit the brakes on your print speeds and slow them w-a-y down. Typical print speeds for non-flexible filaments can range from 30mm/second all the way up to 90mm/second. For flexible, slower is better so we recommended starting around 30mm-40mm/second and see what works best in your particular printer.

2. Proper Extruder Setup

A direct drive extruder will work best when trying to print flexible TPU. However, you can print flexible on a Bowden-type extruder but with some increased difficulty. We are currently working on flexible extruder adaptors that will allow you to print TPU easier on a printer with a Bowden-type extruder. If your printer is not equipped with a Bowden tube, then adding one to help guide the filament can give you a better chance of avoiding filament buckling.

3. Print Temperature

Flexible TPU is especially sensitive when it comes to the temperature of your hot end. We recommend that with our material you start at 220°-245°C and fine-tune your settings for the best results. This will reduce the oozing material from the print head that can create messy or stringy prints.

4. Retraction

Your retraction settings will also play a big part in getting good results and avoiding stringy prints. Retraction is when the extruder motor moves in reverse ever so slightly to avoid extrusion when moving across a gap in a printed design. Too little retraction and you will be left with cobwebs of material all over your print. Too much retraction will leave you with blobs of filament when the print head starts its next segment of printing.

5. Bed Adhesion

Proper bed adhesion is key to any successful print but with flexible TPU, it is even more crucial. We recommend that you only try printing flexible on a printer with a heated bed with the temperature range set between 45°-60°C. Check out our article on bed preparation for more information.

 

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Important Advantages of PETG Filament in 3D Printing

ABS and PLA filaments are widely known in the 3D printing universe, but PETG filament is quickly growing as a popular option for builds. The properties of PETG make it an appropriate choice in producing a vast array of impact-resistant and flexible items.

Composition

PETG is a modified form of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a thermoplastic widely used in plastic bottles. In fact, 43 percent of U.S. soft drinks are delivered in PET bottles.

Glplastic-bottles-webycol-modified PET (PETG) is an increasingly popular filament material because it’s more durable than common alternatives. The addition of glycol prevents crystallization so it won’t become brittle when heated. PETG is a highly transparent co-polyester that can be dyed as required. It is possible to produce brightly colored, translucent prints with a nice, glossy finish with minimal post processing.

Advantages

As the 3D printing industry matured, PETG emerged as a viable and attractive alternative to ABS and PLA. Here are some of the qualities that drive interest in this advanced filament material:

  • Excellent layer adhesion
  • Warp resistance
  • Reduced shrinkage
  • Higher density
  • Chemical resistance to both acidic and alkali compounds
  • Flexible printing on glass, acrylic, glass, blue tape and polyimide tape
  • Odorlessness during printing

Finished prints are pliable and more impact-resistant. In fact, PETG is flexible enough that it is virtually unbreakable in the layer direction. Excellent layer adhesion translates into improved surface finishes. Low shrinkage means it is often a good choice for printing larger items.

Versatile Applications

petg-filament-webPETG is worth considering any time your 3D print needs to be tough, durable, flexible and impact-resistant. It is ideal for use in the production of a wide array of mechanical parts. The rapidly expanding robotics technology sector is also embracing PETG printing. The smooth finish of PETG prints, and the fact that the plastic is FDA-compliant, makes it an appropriate choice for printing creative and/or intricate kitchenware designs. You are really only limited by your imagination.

Enterprises looking for a filament that will produce translucent, shatter-resistant items like phone cases will also want to take a close look at using PETG filament.

 

 

Filament Comparisons

PETG filament favorably compares to other popular 3D printing materials:

  • PLA/PHA filament — Polylactic (PLA) is a biopolymer commonly derived from cornstarch and sugarcane. PETG print speeds are similar to those of PLA, although the melting point is higher. Like, PETG, PLA and PHA filaments are relatively easy to use. However, PETG is more dense (38g/cm3).
  • ABS filament — Acrylonitrile-Butadiene Styrene (ABS) is temperature-resistant like PETG. While ABS is harder, PETG is more flexible and more durable. PETG is odorless during printing, while ABS emits a noticeable odor.
  • TPU filament — Thermoplastic Polyurethane (TPU) is not as dense as PETG; the density of flexible TPU filament is just 1.21g/cm3. The chemical resistance of TPU is good, while the chemical resistance of PETG is excellent.

Once you do the math, you’ll see that PETG can be a high-quality, cost-effective alternative to these other filaments.

Sustainability

One of PETG’s virtues is that it is recyclable. It is different from many other plastics because its polymer chains are readily recovered for future use. PETG can be recycled for use as a gas barrier. Its chemical resistance makes it a good barrier when used with solvents and alcohol. Be sure to always check with your local recycler for their rules and regulations on what you can bring and what they can recycle.

We here at MakeShaper are excited to launch our line of PETG filaments. Available in two diameters and a dozen colors, our filaments provide superb extrusion every time, in every project.

We also offer a wide range of made-in-the-USA filaments in a spectrum of deep, saturated colors and full range of diameters and spool sizes.  Crafted in Sanford, North Carolina, from high-purity raw materials, MakeShaper makes high quality performance filament so you can make anything!

PETG Filament

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Laying it Down – The Importance of Bed Prep

Bed adhesion is one of many factors to consider when it comes to producing successful 3D prints. The first few layers are usually the most crucial as it can set the tone for the rest of the print. MakeShaper has a few suggestions on how to prep your bed prior to printing, but before we dive deeper – the first thing to consider is the orientation of the print itself when printed. Using supports may be a headache to remove, but a large footprint on the print bed could make even the first few layers susceptible to warping or other problems on certain materials.

MakeShaper usually recommends using glue on printers with a heated bed, depending on the filament material. To apply the glue, first start when the bed is cool to avoid the glue melting. A rule of thumb is you want to apply the patch of glue slightly bigger than the base of the printed part. We recommend using a water-based (PVA) standard glue stick. Our office favorite is the classic standard of Elmer’s water-based glue. Since not all materials have the same print characteristics, we recommend different methods for applying glue for different materials.

When printing with ABS, you should use two thin layers of glue. The first layer should be applied in the same direction and not overlap. The second layer should be applied over the first layer perpendicular to the direction of the first layer (think crosshatching or a lattice). This will help reduce the chances of warping when printing with ABS.

absbedprep

When printing with PLA, only use one thin layer of glue. Like preparing the bed for ABS, start by applying glue to a cool bed in the same direction and try to minimize overlap. PLA tends to not warp like ABS so it only needs one layer of glue for good bed adhesion.

plabedprep

When printing with PETG and TPU filament, we do not recommend that you use any kind of additional bed preparation such as glue for layer adhesion.

There are many factors when producing high quality 3D prints. What we recommend may not work for every printer in every environment. Take our recommendations as a baseline and play around to figure out what will work best for your printer, material, design and environment.

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What’s the deal with 3.0 mm filament?

MakeShaper is updating the way we label the diameter on our filament. Our “3.0 mm” filament will now be labeled 2.85 mm. We’ve always manufactured the “3.0mm” filament to a 2.85 mm specification, it’s just a change in the way we will label and refer to the product.

measuring 2.85 filament

So… why did we call it 3 mm if it was 2.85 and why change it now?

Well, there are a lot of 3.0mm printers out there. That designation comes down to the size of their extruders and filament feeding tubes, which are exactly 3.0 mm (or the inner diameter is close to 3.0 mm). When using filament that is exactly 3.0 mm in a 3.0 mm printhead, expect some serious clogging issues, especially with a Bowden type extruder.

In the industry, most filaments labeled 3.0 mm are actually just slightly less in diameter to prevent this issue. We are extremely proud of our tight tolerances and are now updating our labels to match the true diameter of 2.85 mm. There are no changes to the actual filament.

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PLA Filament Reviews by Mike Learned

A while back we were contacted by Mike Learned (who runs a successful YouTube channel called NeoPortnoy 3D Printing) to do a review of our PLA filament for us. We sent him a sampling of our products and through a bit of back and forth conversation, we got his printer optimized and printing our filament with successful results. Check out his video for more information on his thoughts and opinions of our products.

PLA

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MakeShaper Develops Unique Flexible Filament & Adaptors

Printing with flexible filament can open up countless possibilities and opportunities for creative and functional manufacturing. Harnessing these capabilities does not come without effort.

However, MakeShaper, a filament manufacturer in Sanford, North Carolina, has cracked the code for a premium, FDA-compliant, flexible filament that is also easy to use.fusion f360 adapter, 650g tpu filament, FDA flexible filament, FDA filament

“We were approached by a business experiencing problems implementing flexible 3D printing into their product development environment that was also FDA-compliant for a wearable device,” said Erica Edwards, the company’s sales manager. “They had specific needs and were not able to meet product expectations. They were experienced with FDM manufacturing and were already set up with their printers of choice. However, they were unsatisfied with the results they were achieving while testing the current offering of flexible filaments.”

Flexible filament has proven to be a tricky material for many. It is prone to issues related to feeding the filament through the printer. Even printer designs that overcome feed issues can oftentimes produce stringy, unusable prints depending on the specific properties of the filament in use.

The MakeShaper team got to work to develop a solution that could meet the needs of the client, focused around a newly formulated TPU flexible filament. Up until that point, MakeShaper was best known for being the only manufacturer to offer alternative cartridges for Cube2, CubePro and CubeX printers, along with their line of premium ABS and PLA filaments.

scc_headquarters

MakeShaper is a subsidiary of Static Control Components, the largest supplier and manufacturer for the 2D printing aftermarket industry. This connection gives the MakeShaper team a deep history of working within a market to develop timely solutions as well as access to Static Control’s expansive research and development facilities. MakeShaper engineers were eager to create a new, premium flexible filament.

“We assessed the situation and the market as a whole,” said Edwards. “We fine-tuned the material properties of our filament formulation and in the process, also upgraded the capabilities of the printers being used.”

“After it passed our quality standards, we knew we had something that should be shared with others who have struggled with flexible printing,” she said. “We want to bring what we have developed to a wider audience and are releasing TPU 85A flexible filaments.”

makeShaperFlexibleTPU
MakeShaper’s flexible filament offers some unique qualities unseen in other offerings. The filament is FDA-compliant for direct food contact, along with having Pantone-matched color selections. The colorants are UV-stable and colorfast, meaning the color will not fade from the end product over time.

The Shore Hardness of the filament is 85A – roughly the flexibility of shoe soles. The rubbery filament exhibits a slight sheen, meets exacting standards for consistent diameter/ovality and builds prints that are true to design.
makeshaper_box_spool_samples
Edwards also noted that the holistic approach to engineering a solution led to them developing a printer adaptor to help select printers to better utilize flexible filaments.

“We noticed that some printer manufacturers do not recommend using flexible filament because of the material buckling when the filament is pushed through a hot extruder,” said Edwards. “The adaptor modifies the filament feed mechanism and allows printers to easily use flexible filaments with no problems.”

After the adaptor was prototyped, MakeShaper reached out to numerous 3D printer manufacturers to discuss the opportunities an adaptor could provide. With the positive response, a wave of solutions will be released soon for multiple printers.

“This adaptor makes it easier to work with flexible filament and also works with the more common harder plastic filaments, such as ABS and PLA,” said Stephen Daniels, an engineer with MakeShaper. “Before the adaptor, threading flexible filament was like trying to push a rope up a hill in a pipe with no kinks. Not an easy task!”

The adaptor for Fusion F306 printers is currently available and adaptors for MakerBot Replicator/Replicator 2, Zortrax M200, Ultimaker 2+ and Cube2 will be released soon.

And as for the business that sparked the move into flexible filament?

“Ultimately, the business was able to use our flexible filament and get the quality builds they had initially expected,” said a pleased Edwards.

Flexible filament is available on 220g, 650g and 1kg spools in black and natural. Other colors will be released throughout the summer. Larger spools up to 30kg are available by special order.

“We are always open to working with a client to provide market solutions,” Edwards noted. “If you are seeking a filament manufacturing partner or just need some great filament – contact MakeShaper.”

by Shannon Parrish

Flexible TPU

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Cubifyfan visits MakeShaper!

A few weeks ago we had the pleasure of meeting Tom Meeks and showing him around our facilities, Tom wears many hats but one of them is technology and blogging. Tom has been a fan of Cube® printers and runs the blog http://cubifyfans.blogspot.com/ , along with that Tom is heavly involved with The YouthQuest Foundation which supports the academic, vocational and life-enriching development of America’s at-risk youth. If you want to read Tom’s account you can find it below or on his blog http://cubifyfans.blogspot.com/2016/06/visiting-makeshaper-and-witnessing.html#comment-form

Visiting MakeShaper and Witnessing Resilience Firsthand

Last week, I was teaching in the Virginia Beach area and decided, since I was already more than halfway there, that I would make a visit to MakeShaper‘s headquarters in Sanford, NC.   I like to get to know the people behind the products that we use and talk about in this blog.  I expected a find evidence of a commitment to quality.  But, nothing could prepared me for the lengths to which MakeShaper is making to ensure THE highest quality is delivered to their filament customers.

 A Tour to RememberWhile I can’t discuss all the steps that I saw being taken to produce the highest quality product, I can say that they even go so far as to build their own proprietary machinery if that is what it takes to better their peers. MakeShaper is a division of Static Control Components, which began in a garage about 30 years ago.  They sure have come a long way since then.  The facility, which creates 2D printer cartridges as well as the 3D filament that are of interest to us is absolutely massive!  Touring the facility is not only enlightening, it’s exhausting for an old guy.  But, it was well worth it.Resilience and Perseverance on a Grand Scale And, speaking of old guys, one of the most impressive aspects of the tour came in the form of a piece of art and a photograph memorializing a day that could have been the end of Static Control Components (SCC).  In April of 2011 multiple tornadoes touched down in Sanford and decimated SCC’s facilities.  The founder of SCC was 75 at the time and the damage was so severe that many though he simply might walk away.  But, he did not. They were contacting customers and shipping product in days.   Please read this story and view the images of the devastation. Here is a link to a news video that is well worth visiting if you want to understand the company’s character.

MakeShaper for 1st and 2nd Gen Cube & CubePro – More to come

The Makeshaper division is relatively young when compared to the age of parent organization.  So, their product line is still growing.  We saw 3D printers of virtually every make and model being used to develop and test new products.  The current filament choices available for the 1st and 2nd Cube and CubePro are limited to Red, Green, Blue, Black & White in PLA and ABS.  But, I expect that more choices will be forthcoming after extensive testing.

More than Just Filament

Joining me on this visit was Jeff Epps of the Richmond County school system just miles from MakeShaper’s headquarters.  A good deal of the time of the visit was devoted to talking about how 3D design and printing can literally change lives of at-risk students.   Both of us came away impressed by what we heard from MakeShaper’s management.

They ‘get it’.

So, I don’t expect that this meeting will be the last time we meet together to talk about our common goals in the communities in which we serve.

Bottom Line for 1st and 2nd Gen Cube & CubePro Owners.

The reason why I made the trip was to see if I could find evidence as to the steps MakeShaper was taking to ensure that we could trust their products in our printers.  I came away feeling that they are striving to be the manufacturer of THE most reliable filament available.

The comprehensive testing is there.  In fact, the level of testing is so much higher than the industry norm that I cannot even write about it in detail.

The construction is there.  Every cartridge contains a bag of moisture protection INSIDEthe cartridge for continuous protection.  The moisture protection bags are much heavier for additional storage protection.

The price is there.  Currently a 2nd Gen Cartridge is just $25 with free shipping for orders over $50.

So, I would urge you to consider trying MakeShaper.  And, let me know what you think.  After all, the real testing is in YOUR hands.  Only you can attest that the MakeShaper alternative is right for Cube owners.  But, I trust you will find my assessment to match your own.

Let me know….

Cartridges

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PLA Filament Review by Norbert Davis

I’m not a big review person but I did promise to the MakeShaper guys that I would do one when I purchased my PLA from them a while back and well, here it is.

I had made a purchase on the MakeShaper site with the 10% discount on the first order special that they have advertised on this site and while there was a problem with the coupon at first, a quick message the MakeShaper team soon remedied that. I am new to 3D printing with only just under 4 months of designing and printing on my Monoprice Maker Select (Wanhao Duplicator i3 clone). I love my machine and have had little problems with it up until recently where I was getting a lot of clogs and jams in the extruder and nozzle. I had from the start ordered Hatchbox PLA filament and have been quite satisfied with the quality of the material and the prints with them. I suspect that I became spoiled by Hatchbox because I noticed that their filament was always smooth. I had ordered some PLA samples and found them to be rough and they did not seem to have the high tolerance for the diameter that I got with Hatchbox. So when the shipment from MakeShaper arrived I immediately broke into it to check it out. There was Grey, Blue, and Neon Green. Colors that I had not have from Hatchbox. I was excited to use the filament. I did a few runs with them and found that I was having some difficulty with printing correctly as it did not want to stick to the bed and was just printing, well, crappy. But again, a quick email to the MakeShaper team and they came back with some printer settings that made things print quite decently. The one thing that I thought was presenting a problem before I wrote to MakeShaper was the fact that the filament was fairly rough compared to the Hatchbox filament. I was hoping that it really didn’t matter when it went into the hot end and melted then extruded from the nozzle but in the back of my mind I could see where perhaps the roughness was contributing to any imperfections that I saw in the print.

The prints came out decent after the printer setting adjustments and I was fairly impressed with the filament. I did see some things but not every spool of filament is 100% perfect so I will see an issue every now and then but nothing terrible. Then things started getting bad. The printer was sputtering filament whenever I chose the MakeShaper filament and the only thing that seemed to print well was the Hatchbox filament. So naturally, I thought, “Yep, that MakeShaper rough filament is affecting the hot end and making all these problem.” And you probably would have thought the same too if when you switched back to a trusted filament that things went back to normal and you got good prints. You blame the new filament. Well, a couple of weeks later even the trusted filament could not print worth a darn to save its life. I started getting clogs, jams, crappy output (if any) and I had to shut things down for a couple of days while I contemplated the right move; replace the nozzle and PTFE tube with the same stuff or go for the Micro-Swiss All Metal Hot End Upgrade for the Mk-10. Well, the total upgrade it was! It was going to happen eventually and so better now than later. So after a few days the new equipment arrived and I installed it… twice. It seemed that while most everyone else in the world with the MK-10 would not need to use thermal paste to make the new hot end work, I would.

OK, new Hot End is in and working fine. So, was my earlier issues with MakeShaper filament because of the filament itself or was it really the hot end’s fault (or inability)? Well, as it seems, it was the hot end being temperamental and failing to properly heat the incoming filament and give a good smooth extrusion. So after a few test runs to make sure the hot end was 100% I decided to retry the MakeShaper filament (and because my son chose the neon green for his can holder) to see what it could do. Well after a few prints I was really impressed with how the filament was able to lay down some really consistent layers. They wer perfect (from an extrusion sense) and the only real imperfections that happened were due to the machine itself (X & Y) anomalies showing up due to wear and tear on the machine. The filament despite the roughness, or being less smooth than Hatchbox, performed really well. With the new hot end and the updated settings for printing PLA with the new hot end really eliminated stringing and even the overhangs that should have had some real problems did really well.

Over all the MakeShaper PLA filament did excellent in the overhang department as well as just basic layer to layer adhesion. It extruded really smooth and gave me some really consistent prints. Would I recommend this PLA filament to anyone, a resounding “YES”. IT delivers what you expect from a good PLA and the price was good too. I am including some photos of the puzzle and the can holder that I printed with the MakeShaper Blue and Neon Green PLA.

If you have any questions or comments please feel free to let me know.

Thanks MakeShaper and I will be back for more. Once the CFO allows me some more filament budget. lol

Norbert Davis
Elk Grove, Ca
Monoprice Maker Select
w/ Micro-Swiss All Metal Hot End
0.5mm nozzle

can_holder_02, pla filament reviews blue_grip_inside, pla filament reviews blue_grip_macro, pla filament reviews blue_grips, pla filament reviews can_holder_01, pla filament reviews can_holder, pla filament reviews

https://www.3dprintingforum.org/forum/hardware/materials/99126-makeshaper-pla-filament-review

 

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Alternative XYZ Filament Refill Kits for DaVinci Printers

MakeShaper is proud to announce the launch of refill kits for cartridges used in da Vinci 3D printers. This release offers XYZprinting customers the same fit, function and filament quantity as an original cartridge at a reasonable cost to the end user.

xyzprinting, xyz filament refill, xyz pla filament

Each refill comes with a spool of premium MakeShaper filament, along with a replacement chip and desiccant pouch. Easy to understand instructions are included to guide makers through refilling the cartridge.

MakeShaper filaments are made in North Carolina. During manufacturing, laser-gauged measurements are taken to ensure the filament is consistently round and smooth. Since 3D printing materials are sensitive to moisture exposure, all of MakeShaper’s offerings are manufactured in a monitored environment.

MakeShaper refill kits for XYZprinting cartridges for da Vinci printers are available in six colors of ABS: red, blue, green, black, white and natural. PLA filament and additional colors are in development.

MakeShaper products feature the qualities essential to any 3D enthusiast.

  • Quality controlled roundness and smoothness
  • FDA-approved polymers and colorants*
  • UV-stable
  • Consistent color
  • Moisture resistant packaging

 

Refill Kit

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